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Examples and Characteristics of Lofts in Seattle

June 27, 2008 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

Most all dictionaries define a loft as a storage area or attic. This can cause some confusion, so I scoured the Internet to find out everything I could to provide the true definition of a “livable loft.” In real estate terms, all lofts feature ceilings 10′ or higher, and with very few exceptions, large windows measuring 6′ or higher. Lofts can also be classified into three styles; New York Lofts, Industrial Lofts, and Modern Lofts.

Examples of Lofts

New York – Also referred to as the “true” loft, the most common trait among this style is the lofted bedroom. This design also has very high ceilings of 15′ or higher, and traditionally excludes interior walls. New York style lofts typically sell at a premium compared to others because the 2nd story is commonly more desirable.

Examples of Projects in Seattle with New York Style Lofts

Site 17 Veer Lofts Lumen
Site 17 small Veer Lofts small Lumen small

Industrial – This style of loft may or may not include a 2nd story, but strictly refers to industrial or commercial structures that have been converted (usually by the addition of full baths and kitchens). It’s also very common for this style to include exposed brick walls and/or ductwork.

Examples of Projects in Seattle with Industrial Style Lofts

81 Vine Jackson Square Stadium Lofts
81 Vine small jackson square building small Stadium Lofts small

Modern – This style falls into the definition of a loft because of ceiling and window height. However, it’s common for this style of loft to have interior walls separating rooms. This type of design has also become a popular trend in new construction and will typically have a less industrial feel.

Examples of Projects in Seattle with Modern Style Lofts

Klee Mosler Lofts GALLERY
Klee Suites Lofts Mosler Lofts small gallery small

Characteristics of Lofts

In addition to various styles, lofts have various characteristics that make them even more unique. When beginning your search, the more you know about what you’re looking for, the less time you’ll have to spend searching. Here is a guide to help you add to, or cross off, characteristics on your loft wish list.

Exposed Brick Exposed Beams Multi-Level
Loft exposed brick exposed beams 2 story loft
Floor/Ceiling Windows Metal Catwalks Concrete Columns
loft window Loft Metal Catwalks concrete column
Exposed Ductwork Open Kitchen Concrete Ceiling
exposed ductwork Loft with open kitchen loft concrete ceiling

This blog is a great place to search for loft style condos in the downtown Seattle area. If an address features loft style units, the building has been categorized in the “Condo Categories” drop-down menu in the left column of this blog. All condo projects have also been categorized by amenity, location by street, zip code, architect, neighborhood, and more.

If you’re interested in taking a look at some of Seattle’s lofts for sale, contact to arrange a day and time that fits your schedule.

LEED-Certified Condos Yeild Higher Return

June 19, 2008 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

The new generation of buyers are demanding green built features when shopping for their first home, even though it can cost them up to 25% more. Builders are now being forced to make the additional up front investment in construction costs (averaging 2%), but Wikipedia states that they will eventually yield over 10 times that amount over the life cycle of the building. Additionally, developers receive additional incentives from state/local government that help boost press and public interest. Studies also show that LEED-certified buildings average $11.24 more per square foot, and have a 3.8% higher occupancy than non-LEED built homes.

So what is LEED-Certified?

Developed and administered by the U.S. Green Building Council of Washington D.C. (a nonprofit coalition of building industry leaders), The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)™ uses a rating system which offers 4 levels of certification — Certified, Silver, Gold and Platinum. Each certification is designed to represent an “environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy place to live” by measuring building sustainability.

Each level is measured by points in five design categories: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality. The higher the level, the higher the expenditure. However, LEED-certified buildings:

  • Lower operating costs and increased asset value.
  • Reduce waste sent to landfills.
  • Conserve energy and water.
  • Healthier and safer for occupants.
  • Reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Qualify for tax rebates, zoning allowances and other incentives in hundreds of cities.
  • Demonstrate an owner’s commitment to environmental stewardship and social responsibility.</